Ruthless Ruben Takes Fourth British Title

Reigning BRKC champion Ruben Boutens won the British Rental Kart Championship for a fourth consecutive time yesterday and extended his unbeaten run of races at BRKC to thirteen.

Boutens comfortably won each of his heats, with the only danger to his perfect score coming in the form of newcomer Chris Daines who challenged him for victory in the Semi Finals.

In a thrilling climax to the superpole shootout before the grand final, Boutens managed to overhaul erstwhile poleman Lewis Manley to take his first BRKC grand final pole position before storming away at the front of the field once the race was underway.

Behind Boutens, Régis Gosselin established himself in second place after an early pitstop to leapfrog Lewis Manley. Sam Spinnael chose a similar strategy to Gosselin and the pair ran unchallenged for the final two podium places until a late charge from two time World Champion Mathias Grooten dropped Spinnael back to fourth.

However, following a pitstop from Spinnael, Grooten made a reactive stop and caused a yellow light infringement – ultimately demoting him to last place as this was after the ‘Last Chance To Pit’ board had been shown.

At the front, Boutens was unstoppable and once again took the £1000 cash prize along with a free entry into the 2017 Kart World Championship.

BRKC resumes in January 2018.

Full results available here: BRKC 2017 Overall Results

Pictures courtesy of Tim Andrew Photography

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Peerless Ruben Boutens Storms To Third BRKC Title

DOWNLOAD THE FULL RESULTS HERE

 

 

A truly remarkable performance from reigning BRKC champion Ruben Boutens saw him clinch his third British title at Formula Fast in Milton Keynes today.

Boutens was formidable during the heats phase of the competition, having won each of his races and broken the lap record. However, things didn’t go entirely to plan in the Super Pole qualifying session for the final with 2015 runner up Stefan Verhofste taking first place on the grid with Boutens a close second.

Verhofste’s lead was short during the Grand Final itself, with Boutens delivering his customary overtaking manouvre into the main hairpin – never to be challenged again during the race – with Lewis Manley also making his way past Verhofste later in the race.

Having now won three BRKC’s in succession, Ruben Boutens is the most successful driver in BRKC history. Boutens also lowered his own lap record at the Formula Fast circuit during the Grand Final with a 31.5 second lap.

The Kam Ho Memorial award went to Michael Weddell, and the Genevieve Reason ‘Most Determined Driver’ trophy was claimed by Polish driver and fourth placed finisher Matt Bartsch.

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Heat Draw For BRKC 2016 Published

 

The heat draw for the 2016 BRKC has been completed. After rectifying an initial technical hitch, the heat dispersal system was used to allocate drivers into the best possible spread of races, ensuring that they meet a wide variety of other drivers during the BRKC heats.

Notable heats include Round 4 Heat 7, where reigning champion Ruben Boutens faces up to 2016 BRKC runner up Stefan Verhofste, as well as Round 1 Heat 10, which includes BRKC favourites Ed White, Lewis Manley, Ramon Pineiro, Corne Snoep – as well as former FIA Kart World Champion Colin Brown.

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In Depth Live Coverage Announced For BRKC 2016

This week the BRKC organisers agreed an expanded video media coverage package with Scruffy Bear Pictures for the 2016 BRKC. In previous years, the Live Stream was basic on Saturday, with some expanded broadcasting with additional cameras on Sunday.

However, for 2016, the entire BRKC will be covered in depth, with several extra camera angles, along with a producer and director on site at all times. New items include a breakfast show each morning, features like track guides and interviews with key drivers, constant high quality coverage broadcast live throughout the weekend, multiple commentators and pitlane reporters, as well as a generally higher production standard than in previous years.

TV Camera

Scruffy Bear director Darren Cook: “I wasn’t happy with last year’s coverage and we have some great ideas for this year’s BRKC. This year we are stepping up to another level. It’s going to be a beautiful event.”

Spectators around the world will be able to watch the live broadcast online with timing information overlayed – and the feed will be played on TV screens around Formula Fast so that nobody misses a moment of the on-track action throughout the weekend.

Double Champions Hackett & Boutens Return

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2015 Dutch Red Bull Kart Fight Champion Boutens is feeling confident

Since the inception of BRKC in 2010, only two drivers have won the championship more than once. Lee Hackett was triumphant in 2012 & 2013 during the ‘multi-round’ incarnation of BRKC. In 2014 & 2015 it was Dutchman Ruben Boutens who claimed the overall victory. In 2016, the pair will meet on track for the first time since the 2013 Kart World Championship in Denmark.

Although Hackett has had a low key absence from BRKC, he is sure to be back on the pace quickly, having finished as the top British driver in the 2013 World Championship. Boutens on the other hand has been busy winning multiple international titles including the Dutch Kart Championship and the Dutch Red Bull Kart Fight – and is sure to be a force to be reckoned with.

The battle between these two giants of rental karting – as well as many more big names – will be fascinating to watch when BRKC 2016 gets started on the 15th of January.

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Hackett beats Brierley and Boutens to the 2013 BRKC Round 1 victory

 

Interview with Greg Laporte


In 2015 several former World champions competed in the BRKC. We spoke to 2008 Indoor Kart World Champion Greg Laporte about his experience of the championship.

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BRKC: Tell us a little bit about your role with the Kart World Championship.
GL: I am part of the KWC Committee that was founded towards the end of 2007, when the KWC started hosting it events all over the globe, after the initial 3 events on Northern American soil. In this committee, I contribute as an advisor, making rule suggestions, improvements based on event experiences, and I try to help find new locations as well that would be suitable for hosting a big event like the KWC. There are many great tracks around the world, but karts, kart levelling, facilities, are all as important than the track layout itself. So during the year I try and help out the KWC group as much as possible, whilst during the events itself, I’m a competitor where I have no influence on any kind of decisions.

 


 

BRKC: How did BRKC compare with other similar national qualifiers?
GL: I really enjoyed competing in BRKC, even making it to the finals which had some national & international greats there. It was very challenging, which is what we love the most right? Compared to other national qualifiers (I did the Belgian & Italian series), I must say the level of drivers was similar, but the event managing in BRKC was top notch. The timing schedule was excellent. However, what sets BRKC apart is the live commenting during races, driver interviews and the livestream & live timing. This is a great plus and makes the experience for all drivers extra special. I’m definitely coming back to BRKC if my job allows for it.
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BRKC: What advice would you give to a driver competing for the first time in a high level indoor competition?
GL: First of all I would advise every driver to drive as much as possible on different tracks (different karts, surface). Mainly because in the big competitions you will have to race guys who do so much racing all over Europe and the World. All the top guys adjust very fast to a new track, new surface, new karts – so it’s very important to understand quickly what makes you fast, and what doesn’t. Simply trying your best isn’t enough – it really takes dedication and even studying to make it to the top.
I would also advise drivers to watch as many races as possible when you’re not driving yourself. To see what lines drivers are taking, to see where overtaking manouvres pay off and when they don’t, to see what pit strategies work best, etc. You really can learn a lot just with your eyes. Also, most drivers are as passionate as you are, so they will never act weirdly when you simply walk up to them and ask them some questions. Me & my teammates do nothing else but talk trajectories and what works & what doesn’t. This saves us a lot of time because we don’t have to learn everything individually.
Finally, the ultimate key to success will be consistancy, which means being able to resist pressure. You must learn to do your races, regardless who is around you. If it’s a reigning champion, an ex F1-driver, or a rookie, they are just adversaries like all others, and that is something really important. You have to show respect, obviously, but never too much. Be selfish, you want to win, so you must do everything it takes and not be overwhelmed by some ‘big-name’. Fast laps, lap after lap, plus good racecraft and strategy will bring you success. Nothing else.

 


 

 

BRKC: What impressed you most about BRKC in 2015?
GL: The level of dedication by the BRKC people (organisers, staff) and the Formula Fast crew. This combination of a serious organisation team plus dedicated track owners were the key to success for BRKC 2015 in my opinion. Obviously the great level and number of drivers made it something special as well.

Interview conducted in April 2015

New Pitstop System for 2016

BRKC races feature one compulsory pitstop to add a tactical element to the racing.

Pitstop strategy is crucial, and BRKC 2016 will feature an all new technological innovation for precise measurement of each driver’s pitstop.

As the driver enters the ‘stop box’ in the pitlane, a laser activates a red traffic light instructing the driver to stop. After a pre-determined time on ‘stop’, the system activates a green light allowing the driver to continue.

A false start will trigger a separate warning light, notifying both officials and drivers that they must pit again to complete a full stop.

Check out the animation for the new system below:

 

How to make a weighted seat

So you’ve signed up for the best rental kart championship in the country. You’ve bought a cool new race suit, booked yourself some practice – and you can almost taste Formula Fast’s famous pizza. But there’s a problem: You’re 60kg and people have been talking about a standard minimum weight for drivers of 90kg.

 


 

The solution? Create a weighted seat. Now first we should point out that the Formula Fast are able to supply you with up to 20kg of lead blocks to fit in the sidepods, so in our example above, the driver would only require an additional 10kg of weight. However, it’s up to you how much of your additional weight comes in the form of a weighted seat. We’ve seen drivers with 5kg-30kg over the years. As long as the seat is deemed safe and presentable by the officials, you will be able to use it at BRKC.

 


 

Where to start?

 

The first port of call when starting this little project is getting hold of the seat itself. We recommend a Tillet kart seat, preferably Medium/Large or smaller depending on your size. If you’re lucky enough to know some ‘owner driver’ karters, pester them for one of their old damaged seats. Since you aren’t bolting it to the rental karts, it doesn’t need to be in the same condition as on an ‘owner kart’.

However, most drivers will find a seat on Ebay. Don’t pay more than around £30 for one – and never buy a brand new seat unless money really is no object.

Seat

 


 

Next

Now you’ve gotten hold of a seat, you’ll need to attach the weight. This should be in the form of lead sheet which can be purchased at any builders’ merchant. For 10kg, you should expect to pay around £30. It may be worth speaking to local roofing companies (get the yellow pages out!) to see if they have any old offcuts of lead you can have for free.

Attach the lead to the back and the sides of the seat with strong adhesive (No More Nails etc.) and allow to dry. Different drivers have different opinions about the best place to attach the weight – high, low, left, right etc. Why not start a discussion on the Facebook group to see what suits you best?

 

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Finally

The final thing you will need to do is cover the back of the seat (i.e. the lead) with carpet or soft fabric. This is to avoid scratching the rental kart seat. Carpet shops usually have plenty of off-cuts which they can give you for free. Ask other drivers how they made theirs.

Make sure the seat fits snugly into a rental kart seat by visiting your local track and trying it out! Adding some car washing sponges under the carpet on either side usually helps in this endeavour if your seat is pretty small.

 

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WELL DONE! You’re a professional rental karter. Post some pictures of your creation on the BRKC Facebook group. Now where was that pizza…?

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